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Eating Meat in the Field

A buddy of mine and I recently had a conversation about eating deer meat in the field after shooting the animal. I personally don't know if I could stomach the meat after cleaning the deer, but he swears by it. He says, "It is a hunter's reward for the hard work." What are you thoughts on eating meat in the field?

I ran across this article talking about it as well: http://harvestingnature.com/2015/11/...-in-the-field/

Retired2hunt's picture
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Location: Colorado Springs, CO & Fort Myers, FL
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Absolutely and without a doubt!

Absolutely and without a doubt!  Nothing like fresh tenderloins cooked in an iron skillet on a camp fire - a little butter and garlic.  Wow - Try it!   Thumbs up

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Location: Montana, USA
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Eating game meat in the field

Retired2hunt wrote:

Absolutely and without a doubt!  Nothing like fresh tenderloins cooked in an iron skillet on a camp fire - a little butter and garlic.  Wow - Try it!   Thumbs up

Yep, there's nothing better than fresh wild sheep filets cooked over an open fire in camp.

A couple of years after I had movet to Montana, my hunting partner and I were hunting high in the Whitefish Range north of Kalispell.  We had parked my truck at a Forest Service Fire Lookout on top of the mountain and had hunted the ridge south of there.  I killed a 5 point bull and decided to pack one hind quarter and the horns down off the mountain.

I told my partner to drive my truck down to a bridge in the valley at the bottom of the mountain, and wait for me there.  When I got to the valley floor it was dark, overcast, and drizzling rain.  I didn't have a flashlight, and the valley floor between me and the bridgs was a swampy mass of beaver ponds.

My partner and I could yell at each other, but it was hard to understand over the noise of the river.  I didn't want to try to cross that swamp in the dark with a 100 pound pack on my back, so I found a dry spot under a spruce tree and built a fire.  I kept the fire going all night by piling it high with dry dead limbs from under the trees around me.  Then I would cut off and roast slices of meat from the elk quarter I had carried off the mountain.

When it got light the next morning, I could see that I had burned all of the squaw wood for a 50 foot radius around me.  And in the daylight it only took me less than 10 minutes to dryly cross the swamp to where my partner was waiting for me at the bridge.

 

Another quick story...On a caribou hunt in northern Canada, I was helping my Eskimo guide skin and quarter my caribou.  My guide cut off a slice of still warm fat then reached out to give it to me and said "Candy?"  I graciously refused and he grinned and ate it.

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